(Image: Header Graphic)

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Doug's Domain

Doug Vetter, ATP/CFI

dvatp.com has been updated!

Some URLs have changed but you will be automatically redirected to the new locations. Please update your bookmarks! Read more...

Monday September 1, 2003

Because I was a bit late performing the last (mid-cycle) oil service, I covered only about 3500 miles before the red service indicator and the "OIL SERVICE" text appeared. I don't really like doing oil changes more frequently than 5000 miles because there's simply nothing to be gained by doing so, but if for no other reason than to get back "on schedule", I did it anyway. My mechanic took care of everything perfectly as usual, but had one surprise in store for me (what else is new).

He mentioned that I may need front brake pads soon(!) After I got up off the floor (again), I told him I honestly hadn't looked at them recently, but that with only 24K miles since I did all four wheels and given that the first set of pads & rotors lasted 60K miles, I couldn't believe they would be due anytime soon. He told me that the rotors were still well within spec, so I would only need to replace pads. That was the second thing that didn't make sense...I told him I thought BMWs *always* replaced rotors and pads together because they usually wore at equivalent rates. Apparently not.

The only reason for the accelerated wear my mechanic could offer is that BMW must have changed vendors or the vendor changed formulations. I had heard of E46's going through front brakes every 30K miles, but I figured that was because the pads and rotors were completely different than the E36. Apparently not. He then went on to say that he regularly replaces pads before rotors and that, depending on my driving style I might still have 5-10K miles left on them. I thanked him and then walked over to the parts counter to do some research.

I asked the Parts guy if he could trace the part numbers for me to see if BMW at least acknowledged any change in brake pad vendor or formulation via a different part number or whether BMW offered a "high performance" pad for special applications. He said there was only one applicable part number for front pads and another for rear pads because they were from different vendors. Fronts are made by "Textar" and the rears by "Jurid". I've never heard of either vendor, but the fact that my rear brakes were wearing on schedule and the fronts were in the crapper about 35K miles too soon made me think, "uh, Textar brake pads suck ass". Oddly, opinions online seem to favor Textar.

Now for the interesting part...I spoke to a friend with a '98 528 and he said he just replaced his original pads and rotors at a bit over 50K miles. Given that the 528 is a heavier car, it's no surprise he got 10K less life out of them than I did, but I think this proves that my experience with the original pads, while certainly exceptional, is not unique. BMW MUST have changed pads at some point after my car was built (perhaps replacing a semi-metallic with an organic). I told my friend to keep a close eye on his front brakes, because they will likely last half as long as the original set.

So, looks like front pads will need to be done sometime in December. My tires are also nearing end of life (and wearing evenly, incidentally), so I'll likely be out another $600 as well.

Oil Service (P&L): $89, Mileage 83584.

Monday, September 29, 2003

On the drive to work today it dawned on me that I had a mere two days to bring my car through NJ DMV inspection. Of course, as anyone knows, getting through inspection around the end of the month can be a real pain in the ass and I expected today to be no exception. In fact, I figured tomorrow would be worse, so after checking in at the office, I drove over to the local DMV inspection station.

Before I tell you how much fun I had today, a little history is in order. NJ's DMV program was outsourced to a company called Parsons. They were given the charter to reduce costs and improve efficiency, while at the same time creating a new, more rigorous inspection process that would ensure that NJ could meet federal clean air standards. To make a long story short, they wasted more than $400 million of NJ taxpayer money before the State had to step in. What did we get for our money? A system that ran Windows 98(!!), crashed constantly (erasing several cars' worth of inspection data each time), a process that took far longer than that it replaced, and dynos that wouldn't run properly in cold weather. Why am I telling you this? Because recently they washed their hands of the dyno tests and replaced them with analysis of the OBD (On Board Diagnostic) computer interface for all cars 1996 and later.

My 1998 E36 is equipped with OBD II, the second generation system. These systems have a standard physical interface and communications protocols. That means that a mechanic can use the same cable and computer software to interact with the OBD, which explains why the DMV chose to pick on 96+ model year cars even though older cars had OBD functionality. The OBD connector in an E36 BMW is mounted inverted underneath the dash just to the right of the driver's side kick panel. BMW was kind enough to put a little access door over it with a "lock" that could be actuated by the edge of a coin or flat blade screwdriver. The access door is labeled with three big raised letters "OBD". Pretty hard to miss.

As I waited for the car at the end of the inspection line, thinking everything went reasonably well, I went into shock when the line guy walked toward my car with a big red REJECTED sticker. I said "Woa!...failed? For what??. "Uh, we couldn't find the OBD connector." he said. Sure enough, the inspection report said "OBD: missing". A few choice words ensued, and I told the guy if he couldn't find it, it was his problem...I wanted my "Passed" sticker now and he could sort out his lack of data two years hence. After it became clear he wasn't going to give me what I wanted, I asked to see the manager, who then spoke with the line people. They then confessed the OBD connector wasn't "missing", just "inaccessible".

Thinking that these people had just gone off the deep end, I crawled under the dash to look more closely at the receptacle. Sure enough, the receptacle was mounted facing rearward, rather than straight down so it was impossible to insert the plug. I couldn't believe what I was seeing, so I called my mechanic and asked him about it. He said he would have to take a look at it to recommend a course of action, so I left the inspection facility with a glaring "police magnet" affixed to my windshield and drove to the dealership.

As usual, it didn't take my mechanic long to figure out what needed to be done. He used a #1 philips screwdriver to pull two screws out of the OBD receptacle mounting flanges, rotated the receptacle such that it would face straight down, and reinstalled the screws. Well, DUH...if I knew it would be that easy, I would have done it myself, but given my disgust and haste to bring my conflict with DMV personnel to an end (if only for today), I didn't see the screws and just figured BMW had some special right-angled cable assembly for this application. Oh well, live and learn.

My mechanic's only comment was that the 5 series cars have the connector facing aft, while those in 3 series cars are supposed to face downward, so the assembly line guy in Regensburg must have had a few too many lagers that day. Whatever..the problem was solved and I was on my way back to the inspection station within 5 minutes. Fortunately, the reinspection only took about 10 minutes.

Moral? If you live in a state where they have recently instituted OBD analysis as part of the inspection process, you might want to pull that cover and take a quick look at the OBD receptacle to ensure it's installed properly BEFORE you show up at the inspection station. That simple check could save a lot of time and aggravation.

Mileage 84085, Cost $0 (not including my time and aspirin, of course).